Wednesday, April 12, 2017

One Step at a Time!

Yeah, that's right. I ran 22 miles last week. This long period (almost six months) of languishing in the depths of non-runningness has been brutal. But with the help of the ever incredible Dr. Carly May, I seem to be back on the path to being a runner again. I've been dry needled, adjusted, ART'd, stretched, jackhammered, and more. I'm doing knee exercises, hip exercises, working my quads, and who knows what else. It's slowly working.

The highlight of the week was 5 miles of revenge on the Highline Canal. I say revenge simply because it was there, on the Highline six months ago, that I knew I was done running until my knee could be fixed. So, even at a turtle-like 12 minute pace, revenge was sweet.

The best part, however, has been running in my favorite place, the Cherry Creek State Park. I've missed the trails and especially the woods. I've missed the familiarity of running in that fantastic escape from the surrounding hustle and bustle of the city. I've missed running in my backyard, my home away from home.

Another plus has been being able to run with my youngest son Ryan a few days a week. He goes a lot slower than he would probably like in order to run with the old man and I appreciate it. He's always been a runner (ran a 6:22 in the 1st grade), but he never quite found his place with the sport. Maybe now. Who knows, right?

My knee's not perfect. Far from it. While it doesn't really hurt much (maybe 2 on the ten scale), it feels unstable but not really fall over unstable. It's like I know it is there and it isn't quite right yet. The discomfort is outweighed by the joy of being back out there. AND, I see improvement almost daily. So, as Kilian Jornet says, "I think my big moment is always tomorrow."

See you tomorrow. Run on.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Progress!

Not my knee, but I was tempted today to take a picture
I had my second visit with the amazing Dr. Carly today. I'd call my feeling, as I left, "guarded optimism." After months of not running, the word I see there is optimism.

During my first visit ten days ago, she (like me) was a bit taken back by the lack of progress my knee had seen. So, she gave me the works: Dry Needling (with added electronics), adjusting, ART (active release therapy), stretching, exercises, you name it. Then said, "you can't run for two weeks." What?   The issue seems to not just be my knee, but everything around my knee which all is appearing to be way too weak. I was sent home with some exercises. I'm not good with exercises, I confess, but this time I have been diligent.

Friday I walked six miles easily without pain or discomfort (by the way, I have run six miles THOUSANDS of time but never walked that far). Saturday I was getting around REALLY well. Sunday I went fishing and did a little scampering on a sandy hill with no discomfort. Yesterday, I walked the stairs at home like a real live person, and look Ma, no hands. So I was ready for my visit. Maybe a little cocky even.

Today, more needles, some cool mini-jackhammer thing, some big-time hip flexing and many compliments about how well I was doing. On my post session walk, my good knee felt worse than my "bad" one. SO...... I hope to run next week. I want to make sure there are no setbacks when I get back into it, so I might be being a little overly cautious (and I'm okay with that).

Send me a good vibe if you can spare one and run on....

Thursday, March 9, 2017

It's Billy Yang's Fault: Pity Party Over (FINALLY)

My last real run was back in September, the 24th I believe. It was a very sore, almost crippling 5 miles on the Highline Canal. Since that day, almost a half a year ago, I have run about 30 miles. I have gained 20 pounds. I have blamed my doctor, poor physical therapy, old age, bad luck, and just about anything or anyone I can blame. I'm done. It's all on me from here on out.

My first real run, if you want to call my 13+ minute a mile shuffle that, since the December 1st surgery, was 2 1/2 miles on February 16th. I really thought, first off, it would be sooner than that. I mean, football players get scoped and are back on the field in three weeks. And I am traversing nothing. It's straight line city, baby. So why did it take so long? I can answer that in three words: sixty-five years old. So, let's attack this thing like just that: someone who has been on the planet for sixty-five years.....with wisdom.

First, I will stop bitching about my surgeon. Mindset is everything and frankly, while I think she did a token job/went through the motions, I have to get past that. So, that's it, surgeon rant over (and it didn't really begin because I could REALLY elaborate on that one).

Next, I need help, so I will get some. I've tried to do what I have done for almost a half a century; cure my running ills myself. Well, after a very frustrating last 2+ months, we're starting with the wonderful Dr. Carly May tomorrow morning. We'll see where it goes from there.

You see, I don't have much pain, if any. My biggest issue that turned today's run into a walk is support. I just feel like the thing is going to give out. Maybe it's screwed up big time, maybe it just need to get stronger, maybe it just needs some K-Tape for some kind of support. Carly will know. She'll also be great to suggest the best strengthening exercises and some other PT like stuff. 

Sadly, I have spent the last few months being complacent with being a partial/non runner. I avoided my magazines, stopped watching running videos, and basically tried to deny who I am. Then, somehow tonight, I found Billy Yang's latest movie, Life in a Day (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYgcTJBLwsU). Then I found his 2016 recap. Then I found Jim Walmsley, Kilian Jornet, and then it was all over. I recaptured my love. Just like in a corny movie, my running pranced toward me in slow motion. I ran towards it in gimpy slow, slow motion. We embraced (you had me at hello).

Last year this "issue" cost me my running the San Francisco Marathon, the Squamish 50K, and the NYC Marathon on my 65th birthday. And not just the experiences, but like $600 bucks! And frankly, I'm sick of this. I have run almost 110,000 miles and I've got news, I'm not finished by a long shot.

There's much to do. My appointment is tomorrow. I'm looking forward to it. I'm looking forward to running for real again. I'm looking to forward to taking my life back. 

Thanks Billy. Run on.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Six Week Knee Update. Guarded Optimism

It's been six weeks since my knee surgery and I am, what you might call a Guarded Optimist. Watch the video below for details....

Link to Video

Monday, January 2, 2017

2017. Gotta be Better Than This!

In keeping with my New Years recap habit, I am posting here today without much to recap. I did get in 1689 miles this year, which is certainly not my worst year, but not very satisfying as I was on track for 2500. Injuries kept me out of the San Francisco Marathon, the Squamish 50K, and the New York City Marathon. Lots of $$$ down the tube.

I found it though. It was August 15th, two days after a hard 12 mile run that I made the following notation in my training log: "back of left knee sore, stiff, non-supportive." The next day I missed my first day of running for 2016. After that, it was all downhill (more on that at http://runspittle.blogspot.com/2016/10/good-news-bad-news-bad-news-and.html).

On December 1, I had knee surgery. The proposed microfracture surgery was not performed as it was not deemed to be the best solution to my issues. SO, I was cleaned, tightened up and sent on my merry way (or not so merry way, see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-Hl-ENbuck). Since then it was been ice, elevation and exercises.

Yesterday (the 1st) was my target for my first post-surgery run. It didn't happen. Instead I went for a three mile walk. Not very satisfying to say the least. The knee just isn't ready.

Swelling is down. Flexibility is up. Pain is minimal. Instability is the biggest culprit at this point, so I'll keep working it in the hope that within the next few weeks a real live run is possible. After that, we'll see. 

Run on (and get in a few for me).


Friday, October 14, 2016

Good News, Bad News, Bad News and Perspective

So Wednesday, Dr. Michelle Wolcott and I examined the MRI of my knee. The hope was for something easy like a meniscus tear. Go in snip, snip, back on the roads in three weeks. No such luck! Bad news.

There is about a 2cm section of the cartilage in my left knee that is gone. Yeah, like gone, disappeared, vanished. Surgical options: microfracture surgery (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microfracture_surgery.) Six weeks on crutches, five or six months rehab. The two other options had to do with cadaver cartilage and very strange things, so I quit listening. Bad news 2.

So what's the good news? Oddly, the good news is very little arthritis (especially for a guy with 109,000 miles on his legs). I'll take it where I can get it.

Sunday, three weeks before the race, I will withdraw from the New York City marathon and be able to guarantee entry for 2017. Yep, keeping the options open. My plan is to have the surgery in December prior to a four week stretch where I do not have gigs booked. Good recovery time, right?

I've been sick about this for a month, and cannot imagine not running for that long (the elliptical is not my friend). It's been difficult to say the least. Yesterday, however, it all changed. As I sit next to my youngest son Ryan, lying in his cardiac care room of the South Aurora hospital (he'll be okay), perspectives change and the things that are really important become just that: really important.

I will run again. Most importantly, he'll be fine. Good news, Bad news, Bad news, Great news.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

One Step Forward, Three Steps Back

Today I had a follow-up visit to Dr. Michelle Wolcott. She is my orthopedic surgeon. Orthopedic surgeon, you ask? Yep. Things have gone from better to worse, to better to worse since we last posted.

Growing out of my butt issue, came a knee issue. Extreme tightness and pain behind my knee which got so bad on two occasions that I would get 2 - 3 miles out on a run and have to walk back. The first thought from my usual Doc, the magnificent, Carly May, was Popliteus muscle (my thought too). So just before she went off to vacation time, we scheduled an X-Ray. That X-Ray, instead, returned a finding of some mild arthritis. Really? Some "mild" arthritis after 50 years and 109,000 + miles of running? As I stated in the last blog, I'll take that after all this time.

I existed on a crutch for a few days and was progressing nicely until I was demonstrating a stretch and went to use my left leg to get up and the knee completely collapsed under me. I'm good, generally speaking, with pain but this was pretty, stinking, big time, painful. Back to the crutch, and off to see an orthopedic surgeon to find out what the problem really is.

A new set of X-Rays were ordered as orthopedic surgeons have their own way they like to look at things. Dr. Wolcott ("call me, Michelle") didn’t completely ruled out a possible meniscus “weakening,” although, she found no reason to think a tear was present after a thorough examination. We spent a lot of time discussing cartilage and looking at my x-rays. I have “a good amount of stuff” floating around in my knee and while it could be cleaned up through arthroscopic surgery at some point, she was not thinking that is the immediate problem. Her general conclusion was (and I had her let me record it) was: 

“You don’t really have arthritis but the cartilage is starting to crack and break down a little bit and that’s causing friction and some swelling in your knee. Because of that swelling the muscles aren’t firing quick enough on impact to support the knee and so the feeling of weakness and pain.”

She gave a couple of immediate options, and to tell you the truth I don’t remember them. I did opt for the steroid injection. I'd never had an injection in my knee before so I was a bit apprehensive. She got it done quickly and frankly, I really didn't notice it happening. My knee was supposed to be numb for a bit and if I was feeling ready and had no issues after 48-72 hours I should try a light, short run. SO, I did. This was two weeks ago.

I pretty much shuffle jogged day one (the third day) and decided I was pressing my luck. I took another day off and then hit the woods in the Cherry Creek State Park for 3 miles (flat, soft, wide trail - just what the doctor ordered, so to speak). Not pain free yet, but not bad. Over the next 6 days, I ran 3,3,4,0,3,5 miles. Then after the okay 5 miles, I went to open the door for someone at Walmart (that'll teach me to be a gentleman at Walmart), and my knee just gave out. A shot of pain up the side and OUCH.

Clifton 3 by Hoka
In the several days to follow, every time I would stand or move in a "not perfectly straight, supported manner," I'd get the pain. So today, I was back in for follow-up with Dr. Michelle. The check up was quick, as the immediate plan was MRI. She is believing the issue now to be a degenerative meniscus tear, but is open to whatever is found. We discussed the options if that, or something else concrete, is found, including surgery. We'll see about that.

In the meantime, I ordered a kick ass pair of Hoka Clifton 3's. They arrived yesterday. I'm waiting to run in them.....